Using machine learning and analytics to attract and retain employees

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar blog.]

The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: Maryam Jahanshahi on building tools to help improve efficiency and fairness in how companies recruit.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Maryam Jahanshahi, research scientist at TapRecruit, a startup that uses machine learning and analytics to help companies recruit more effectively. In an upcoming survey, we found that a “skills gap” or “lack of skilled people” was one of the main bottlenecks holding back adoption of AI technologies. Many companies are exploring a variety of internal and external programs to train staff on new tools and processes. The other route is to hire new talent. But recent reports suggest that demand for data professionals is strong and competition for experienced talent is fierce. Jahanshahi and her team are building natural language and statistical tools that can help companies improve their ability to attract and retain talent across many key areas.

Here are some highlights from our conversation:

Optimal job titles

The conventional wisdom in our field has always been that you want to optimize for “the number of good candidates” divided by “the number of total candidates.” … The thinking is that one of the ways in which you get a good signal-to-noise ratio is if you advertise for a more senior role. … In fact, we found the number of qualified applicants was lower for the senior data scientist role.

… We saw from some of our behavioral experiments that people were feeling like that was too senior a role for them to apply to. What we would call the “confidence gap” was kicking in at that point. It’s a pretty well-known phenomena that there are different groups of the population that are less confident. This has been best characterized in terms of gender. It’s the idea that most women only apply for jobs when they meet 100% of the qualifications versus most men will apply even with 60% of the qualifications. That was actually manifesting.

Highlighting benefits

We saw a lot of big companies that would offer 401(k), that would offer health insurance or family leave, but wouldn’t mention those benefits in the job descriptions. This had an impact on how candidates perceived these companies. Even though it’s implied that Coca-Cola is probably going to give you 401(k) and health insurance, not mentioning it changes the way you think of that job.
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How machine learning impacts information security

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: Andrew Burt on the need to modernize data protection tools and strategies.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Andrew Burt, chief privacy officer and legal engineer at Immuta, a company building data management tools tuned for data science. Burt and cybersecurity pioneer Daniel Geer recently released a must-read white paper (“Flat Light”) that provides a great framework for how to think about information security in the age of big data and AI. They list important changes to the information landscape and offer suggestions on how to alleviate some of the new risks introduced by the rise of machine learning and AI.

We discussed their new white paper, cybersecurity (Burt was previously a special advisor at the FBI), and an exciting new Strata Data tutorial that Burt will be co-teaching in March.
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9 AI trends on our radar

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

How new developments in automation, machine deception, hardware, and more will shape AI.

Here are key AI trends business leaders and practitioners should watch in the months ahead.

We will start to see technologies enable partial automation of a variety of tasks.

Automation occurs in stages. While full automation might still be a ways off, there are many workflows and tasks that lend themselves to partial automation. In fact, McKinsey estimates that “fewer than 5% of occupations can be entirely automated using current technology. However, about 60% of occupations could have 30% or more of their constituent activities automated.”

We have already seen some interesting products and services that rely on computer vision and speech technologies, and we expect to see even more in 2019. Look for additional improvements in language models and robotics that will result in solutions that target text and physical tasks. Rather than waiting for a complete automation model, competition will drive organizations to implement partial automation solutions—and the success of those partial automation projects will spur further development.
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7 data trends on our radar

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

From infrastructure to tools to training, here’s what’s ahead for data.

Whether you’re a business leader or a practitioner, here are key data trends to watch and explore in the months ahead.

Increasing focus on building data culture, organization, and training

In a recent O’Reilly survey, we found that the skills gap remains one of the key challenges holding back the adoption of machine learning. The demand for data skills (“the sexiest job of the 21st century”) hasn’t dissipated. LinkedIn recently found that demand for data scientists in the US is “off the charts,” and our survey indicated that the demand for data scientists and data engineers is strong not just in the US but globally.

With the average shelf life of a skill today at less than five years and the cost to replace an employee estimated at between six and nine months of the position’s salary, there is increasing pressure on tech leaders to retain and upskill rather than replace their employees in order to keep data projects (such as machine learning implementations) on track. We are also seeing more training programs aimed at executives and decision makers, who need to understand how these new ML technologies can impact their current operations and products.
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In the age of AI, fundamental value resides in data

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: Haoyuan Li on accelerating analytic workloads, and innovation in data and AI in China.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Haoyuan Li, CEO and founder of Alluxio, a startup commercializing the open source project with the same name (full disclosure: I’m an advisor to Alluxio). Our discussion focuses on the state of Alluxio (the open source project that has roots in UC Berkeley’s AMPLab), specifically emerging use cases here and in China. Given the large-scale use in China, I also wanted to get Li’s take on the state of data and AI technologies in Beijing and other parts of China.

Here are some highlights from our conversation:
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Books I enjoyed in 2018

Here are nonfiction books I enjoyed reading in 2018 (more precisely, these are books I read during the second part of 2017 through 2018). Not all of these books were released this year, although most them are 2018 releases. I read many of these using Apple Books on my iPad but I’ve also gotten back to scouring thrift stores and used bookstores (where I’ve gotten some amazing bargains this year).


China
My wife and I have taken several trips to China over the last few years, and along the way I’ve enjoyed several books that I list below:

  • The China Questions: Critical Insights into a Rising Power – This highly readable collection of essays is truly an essential resource.
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