The current state of Apache Kafka

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: Neha Narkhede on data integration, microservices, and Kafka’s roadmap.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Neha Narkhede, co-founder and CTO of Confluent. As I noted in a recent post on “The Age of Machine Learning,” data integration and data enrichment are non-trivial and ongoing challenges for most companies. Getting data ready for analytics—including machine learning—remains an area of focus for most companies. It turns out, “data lakes” have become staging grounds for data; more refinement usually needs to be done before data is ready for analytics. By making it easier to create and productionize data refinement pipelines on both batch and streaming data sources, analysts and data scientists can focus on analytics that can unlock value from data.

On the open source side, Apache Kafka continues to be a popular framework for data ingestion and integration. Narkhede was part of the team that created Kafka, and I wanted to get her thoughts on where this popular framework is headed.

Here are some highlights from our conversation:

The first engineering project that made use of Apache Kafka

If I remember correctly, we were putting Hadoop into a place at LinkedIn for the first time, and I was on the team that was responsible for that. The problem was that all our scripts were actually built for another data warehousing solution. The questions was, are we going to rewrite all of those scripts and now sort of make them Hadoop specific? And what happens when a third and a fourth and a fifth system is put into place?

So, the initial motivating use case was: ‘we are putting this Hadoop thing into place. That’s the new-age data warehousing solution. It needs access to the same data that is coming from all our applications. So, that is the thing we need to put into practice.’ This became Kafka’s very first use case at LinkedIn. From there, because that was very easy and I actually helped move one of the very first workloads to Kafka, it was hardly difficult to convince the rest of the LinkedIn engineering team to start moving over to Kafka.
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