The current state of Apache Kafka

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: Neha Narkhede on data integration, microservices, and Kafka’s roadmap.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Neha Narkhede, co-founder and CTO of Confluent. As I noted in a recent post on “The Age of Machine Learning,” data integration and data enrichment are non-trivial and ongoing challenges for most companies. Getting data ready for analytics—including machine learning—remains an area of focus for most companies. It turns out, “data lakes” have become staging grounds for data; more refinement usually needs to be done before data is ready for analytics. By making it easier to create and productionize data refinement pipelines on both batch and streaming data sources, analysts and data scientists can focus on analytics that can unlock value from data.

On the open source side, Apache Kafka continues to be a popular framework for data ingestion and integration. Narkhede was part of the team that created Kafka, and I wanted to get her thoughts on where this popular framework is headed.

Here are some highlights from our conversation:

The first engineering project that made use of Apache Kafka

If I remember correctly, we were putting Hadoop into a place at LinkedIn for the first time, and I was on the team that was responsible for that. The problem was that all our scripts were actually built for another data warehousing solution. The questions was, are we going to rewrite all of those scripts and now sort of make them Hadoop specific? And what happens when a third and a fourth and a fifth system is put into place?

So, the initial motivating use case was: ‘we are putting this Hadoop thing into place. That’s the new-age data warehousing solution. It needs access to the same data that is coming from all our applications. So, that is the thing we need to put into practice.’ This became Kafka’s very first use case at LinkedIn. From there, because that was very easy and I actually helped move one of the very first workloads to Kafka, it was hardly difficult to convince the rest of the LinkedIn engineering team to start moving over to Kafka.
Continue reading “The current state of Apache Kafka”

Bits from the Data Store

Semi-regular field notes from the world of data:

  • Michael Jordan (“ask me anything”): The distinguished machine learning and Bayesian researcher from UC Berkeley’s AMPLab has an interesting perspective on machine learning and statistics.

    … while I do think of neural networks as one important tool in the toolbox, I find myself surprisingly rarely going to that tool when I’m consulting out in industry. I find that industry people are often looking to solve a range of other problems, often not involving “pattern recognition” problems of the kind I associate with neural networks. E.g., (1) How can I build and serve models within a certain time budget so that I get answers with a desired level of accuracy, no matter how much data I have? (2) How can I get meaningful error bars or other measures of performance on all of the queries to my database? (3) How do I merge statistical thinking with database thinking (e.g., joins) so that I can clean data effectively and merge heterogeneous data sources? (4) How do I visualize data, and in general how do I reduce my data and present my inferences so that humans can understand what’s going on? (5) How can I do diagnostics so that I don’t roll out a system that’s flawed or figure out that an existing system is now broken? (6) How do I deal with non-stationarity? (7) How do I do some targeted experiments, merged with my huge existing datasets, so that I can assert that some variables have a causal effect?

  • knitr: Is an R package for dynamic report generation. Among other things it lets you embed R code within Markdown and LaTeX.
  • Computer Security and Data Science: A nice curated collection of papers on topics such as intrusion detection, anomaly detection, Internet scale data collection, malware analysis, and intrusion/breach reports.
  • SociaLite: A distributed query language for large-scale graph analysis that targets Python users. Data is stored in (in-memory) tables and programming logic is expressed in rules, which from the Quick Start code aren’t as easy to grok as SQL.

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