Building accessible tools for large-scale computation and machine learning

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Eric Jonas, a postdoc in the new Berkeley Center for Computational Imaging. Jonas is also affiliated with UC Berkeley’s RISE Lab. It was at a RISE Lab event that he first announced Pywren, a framework that lets data enthusiasts proficient with Python run existing code at massive scale on Amazon Web Services. Jonas and his collaborators are working on a related project, NumPyWren, a system for linear algebra built on a serverless architecture. Their hope is that by lowering the barrier to large-scale (scientific) computation, we will see many more experiments and research projects from communities that have been unable to easily marshal massive compute resources. We talked about Bayesian machine learning, scientific computation, reinforcement learning, and his stint as an entrepreneur in the enterprise software space.

Here are some highlights from our conversation:

Pywren

The real enabling technology for us was when Amazon announced the availability of AWS Lambda, their microservices framework, in 2014. Following this prompting, I went home one weekend and thought, ‘I wonder how hard it is to take an arbitrary Python function and marshal it across the wire, get it running in Lambda; I wonder how many I can get at once?’ Thus, Pywren was born.
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Notes from the first Ray meetup

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

Ray is beginning to be used to power large-scale, real-time AI applications.

Machine learning adoption is accelerating due to the growing number of large labeled data sets, languages aimed at data scientists (R, Julia, Python), frameworks (scikit-learn, PyTorch, TensorFlow, etc.), and tools for building infrastructure to support end-to-end applications. While some interesting applications of unsupervised learning are beginning to emerge, many current machine learning applications rely on supervised learning. In a recent series of posts, Ben Recht makes the case for why some of the most interesting problems might actually fall under reinforcement learning (RL), specifically systems that are able to act based upon past data and do so in a way that is safe, robust, and reliable.

But first we need RL tools that are accessible for practitioners. Unlike supervised learning, in the past there hasn’t been a good open source tool for easily trying RL at scale. I think things are about to change. I was fortunate enough to receive an invite to the first meetup devoted to RayRISE Lab’s high-performance, distributed execution engine, which targets emerging AI applications, including those that rely on reinforcement learning. This was a small, invite-only affair held at OpenAI, and most of the attendees were interested in reinforcement learning.

Here’s a brief rundown of the program:

  • Robert Nishihara and Philipp Moritz gave a brief overview and update on the Ray project, including a description of items on the near-term roadmap.
  • Eric Liang and Richard Liawgave a quick tour of two libraries built on top of Ray: RLlib(scalable reinforcement learning) and Tune(a hyperparameter optimization framework). They also pointed a to a recent ICML paper on RLlib. Both of these libraries are easily accessible to anyone familiar with Python, and both should prove popular among industrial data scientists.

RLlib and reinforcement learning. Image courtesy of RISE Lab.

  • Eugene Vinitsky showed some amazing videos of how Ray is helping them understand and predict traffic patterns in real time, and in the process help researchers study large transportation networks. The videos were some of the best examples of the combination of IoT, sensor networks, and reinforcement learning that I’ve seen.
  • Alex Bao of Ant Financial described three applications they’ve identified for Ray. I’m not sure I’m allowed to describe them here, but they were all very interesting and important use cases. The most important takeaway for the evening was Ant Financial is already using Ray in production in two of the three use cases (and they are close to deploying Ray to production for the third)! Given that Ant Financial is the largest unicorn company in the world, this is amazing validation for Ray.

With the buzz generated by the evening’s presentations and early examples of production deployments beginning to happen, I expect meetups on Ray to start springing up in other geographic areas. We are still in the early stages of adoption of machine learning technologies. The presentations at this meetup confirm that an accessible and scalable platform like Ray, opens up many possible applications of reinforcement learning and online learning.

For more on Ray:

Unleashing the potential of reinforcement learning

[A version of they post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: Danny Lange on how reinforcement learning can accelerate software development and how it can be democratized.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Danny Lange, VP of AI and machine learning at Unity Technologies. Lange previously led data and machine learning teams at Microsoft, Amazon, and Uber, where his teams were responsible for building data science tools used by other developers and analysts within those companies. When I first heard that he was moving to Unity, I was curious as to why he decided to join a company whose core product targets game developers.

As you’ll glean from our conversation, Unity is at the forefront of some of the most exciting, practical applications of deep learning (DL) and reinforcement learning (RL). Realistic scenery and imagery are critical for modern games. GANs and related semi-supervised techniques can ease content creation by enabling artists to produce realistic images much more quickly. In a previous post, Lange described how reinforcement learning opens up the possibility of training/learning rather than programming in game development.

Lange explains why simulation environments are going to be important tools for AI developers. We are still in the early days of machine intelligence, and I am looking forward to more tools that can democratize AI research (including future releases by Lange and his team at Unity).

Here are some highlights from our conversation:

Why reinforcement learning is so exciting

I’m a huge fan of reinforcement learning. I think it has incredible potential, not just in game development but in a lot of other areas, too. … What we are doing at Unity is basically making reinforcement learning available to the masses. We have shipped open source software on GitHub called Unity ML Agents, that include the basic frameworks for people to experiment with reinforcement learning. Reinforcement learning is really creating a machine learned-driven feedback loop. Recall the example I previously wrote about, of the chicken crossing the road; yes, it gets hit thousands and thousands of times by these cars, but every time it gets hit, it learns that’s a bad thing. And every time it manages to pick up a gift package on the way over the road, that’s a good thing.

Over time, it gets superhuman capabilities in crossing this road, and that is fantastic because there’s not a single line of code going into that. It’s pure simulation, and through reinforcement learning it captures a method. It learns a method to cross the road, and you can take that into many different aspects of games. There are many different methods you can train. You can add two chickens—can they collaborate to do something together? We are looking at what we call multi-agent systems, where two or more of these trained reinforcement learning-trained agents are acting together to achieve a goal.
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Machine learning needs machine teaching

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The O’Reilly Data Show Podcast: Mark Hammond on applications of reinforcement learning to manufacturing and industrial automation.

In this episode of the Data Show, I spoke with Mark Hammond, founder and CEO of Bonsai, a startup at the forefront of developing AI systems in industrial settings. While many articles have been written about developments in computer vision, speech recognition, and autonomous vehicles, I’m particularly excited about near-term applications of AI to manufacturing, robotics, and industrial automation. In a recent post, I outlined practical applications of reinforcement learning (RL)—a type of machine learning now being used in AI systems. In particular, I described how companies like Bonsai are applying RL to manufacturing and industrial automation. As researchers explore new approaches for solving RL problems, I expect many of the first applications to be in industrial automation.

Here are some highlights from our conversation:

Machine learning and machine teaching

Everyone is so focused on making better and faster learning algorithms; what do we do when we have it? Let’s just suppose that you now have an algorithm that can learn as well as or better than humans. How do we use that, how do we apply that in a predictable, scalable, repeatable way toward the objectives that we want to apply it toward?

… I thought about that for a while, and it’s one of those things where the answer is obvious in hindsight, but until you sit down and really chew on it, it doesn’t jump out at you. And it’s that, by design, if you’re building a learning system—if you want to program it—you have to teach it. Machine teaching and machine learning are necessary complements to one another; you need both. And for the large part, most of what comprises machine teaching these days consists of giant label data sets.

… You need machine teaching and machine learning. It dawned on me that this was the core abstraction that was going to make it possible for us to start applying all of this stuff more broadly across all the myriad use cases that we see in the real world without having to turn all of the people who are looking to use it into experts in machine learning and data science. It’s what enabled me to realize what Bonsai’s mission is: to enable your subject matter experts (a chemical engineer or a mechanical engineer, someone who is very, very well versed in whatever their domain is but not necessarily in machine learning or data science) to take that expertise and use it as the foundation for describing what to teach and then automating the underlying pieces for how you can actually effectively learn that.

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Introducing RLlib: A composable and scalable reinforcement learning library

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RISE Lab’s Ray platform adds libraries for reinforcement learning and hyperparameter tuning.

In a previous post, I outlined emerging applications of reinforcement learning (RL) in industry. I began by listing a few challenges facing anyone wanting to apply RL, including the need for large amounts of data, and the difficulty of reproducing research results and deriving the error estimates needed for mission-critical applications. Nevertheless, the success of RL in certain domains has been the subject of much media coverage. This has sparked interest, and companies are beginning to explore some of the use cases and applications I described in my earlier post. Many tasks and professions, including software development, are poised to incorporate some forms of AI-powered automation. In this post, I’ll describe how RISE Lab’s Ray platform continues to mature and evolve just as companies are examining use cases for RL.

Assuming one has identified suitable use cases, how does one get started with RL? Most companies that are thinking of using RL for pilot projects will want to take advantage of existing libraries.


RL training nests many types of computation. Image courtesy of Richard Liaw and Eric Liang, used with permission.

There are several open source projects that one can use to get started. From a technical perspective, there are a few things to keep in mind when considering a library for RL:
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Practical applications of reinforcement learning in industry

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

An overview of commercial and industrial applications of reinforcement learning.

The flurry of headlines surrounding AlphaGo Zero (the most recent version of DeepMind’s AI system for playing Go) means interest in reinforcement learning (RL) is bound to increase. Next to deep learning, RL is among the most followed topics in AI. For most companies, RL is something to investigate and evaluate but few organizations have identified use cases where RL may play a role. As we enter 2018, I want to briefly describe areas where RL has been applied.

RL is confusingly used to refer to a set of problems and a set of techniques, so let’s first settle on what RL will mean for the rest of this post. Generally speaking, the goal in RL is learning how to map observations and measurements to a set of actions while trying to maximize some long-term reward. This usually involves applications where an agent interacts with an environment while trying to learn optimal sequences of decisions. In fact, many of the initial applications of RL are in areas where automating sequential decision-making have long been sought. RL poses a different set of challenges from traditional online learning, in that you often have some combination of delayed feedback, sparse rewards, and (most importantly) the agents in question are often able to affect the environments with which they interact.
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Why continuous learning is key to AI

[A version of this post appears on the O’Reilly Radar.]

A look ahead at the tools and methods for learning from sparse feedback.

As more companies begin to experiment with and deploy machine learning in different settings, it’s good to look ahead at what future systems might look like. Today, the typical sequence is to gather data, learn some underlying structure, and deploy an algorithm that systematically captures what you’ve learned. Gathering, preparing, and enriching the right data—particularly training data—is essential and remains a key bottleneck among companies wanting to use machine learning.

I take for granted that future AI systems will rely on continuous learning as opposed to algorithms that are trained offline. Humans learn this way, and AI systems will increasingly have the capacity to do the same. Imagine visiting an office for the first time and tripping over an obstacle. The very next time you visit that scene—perhaps just a few minutes later—you’ll most likely know to look out for the object that tripped you.

There are many applications and scenarios where learning takes on a similar exploratory nature. Think of an agent interacting with an environment while trying to learn what actions to take and which ones to avoid in order to complete some preassigned task. We’ve already seen glimpses of this with recent applications of reinforcement learning (RL). In RL, the goal is to learn how to map observations and measurements to a set of actions, while trying to maximize some long-term reward. (The term RL is frequently used to describe both a class of problems and a set of algorithms.) While deep learning gets more media attention, there are many interesting recent developments in RL that are well known within AI circles. Researchers have recently applied RL to game play, robotics, autonomous vehicles, dialog systems, text summarization, education and training, and energy utilization.
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